Surety Bonds

Renewing your bond? Renew with us, the insurance and bonding agency worth recommending since 1949

Posted by BFBOND on December 02, 2016
Bonds FYI, News, Surety Bonds, Uncategorized / Comments Off on Renewing your bond? Renew with us, the insurance and bonding agency worth recommending since 1949

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Many surety bonds are issued on a fixed term but there are some bonds with specific expiration dates set by the obligee, so it is important that you’re aware of when you are required to renew your bond. There are many bonds that expire on December 31st every year so to avoid a lapse in coverage and potential punitive action make sure to check your bond type and its expiration date.

 
It is highly encouraged that all surety bond renewals are done before the current term has ended. That way, there is considerably less chance of any issues that could result in a lapse of coverage. Keep in mind that by waiting until the last minute, if there is a lapse in coverage due to the principal’s failure to renew on time the principal may find themselves without the bond coverage necessary, which may result in penalties.

 
This is especially true for renewals due at the end of the year during the holiday season, when many local government and state offices have more limited hours of operation. We offer surety bonds in all 50 States with a quick and convenient application process to avoid delays. For further information on our surety bond products visit us at bfbond.com, call us at 800.921.1008 or get an application here.

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Would a crime policy cover this?

Posted by BFBOND on November 23, 2016
Bond Issues, Bonds FYI, Crime Coverage, Fidelity Bonds, Surety Bonds, Uncategorized / Comments Off on Would a crime policy cover this?

Strange way of stealing Gold from the Royal Canadian Mint.

Via the Anus!

goldbullion1717128The case against Leston Lawrence, 35, in an Ottawa courtroom presided over by Justice Peter Doody on a number of smuggling-for-cash charges may seem like a joke, but the risk of employee dishonesty is all too real. Mr. Lawrence is accused of theft, laundering the proceeds of crime, possession of stolen property, breach of trust and he was fired from the Mint. Would a Fidelity Crime Bond cover this?

 
During testimony it was revealed that Mr. Lawrence set off the metal detectors more often than the other employees (Except for the ones with medical implants), requiring manual scans using a metal detecting wand but they never seemed to find anything on him. Investigators say that he used Vaseline and rubber gloves that they found in his work locker to aid in smuggling the cookie sized pucks of gold.

 
Four of the pucks were found in a safe deposit box owned by Lawrence and he had sold 18 of them for approximately $6,800 each from November 2014 to March 2015. Subsequently, an obviously dedicated security employee tested the idea that the pucks could be concealed in an anal cavity and not be detected by the wand.

 
Curiously, the mint never noticed any gold missing. After a bank teller noticed Mr. Lawrence had been cashing several checks from a gold dealer and then transferring the money out of the country is when the teller looked up the man’s place of work and alerted the mint to the suspicious activity.

 
Jaw dropping statistics from the ‘Statistic Brain’ website, trusted research provider for Forbes, CNN, ABC News, and many others reveals that the amount stolen annually from U.S. businesses by employees is $50,000,000,000 and 7% of annual revenues are lost to employee dishonesty and fraud.

 
Although a minority of employees becomes dishonest, they can rationalize their theft in many ways: ‘the company won’t miss it,’ ‘they’re not paying me enough,’ or the person succumbs to gambling or some other addiction. Protecting a business with a Fiduciary bond aka Crime bond or Fidelity bond is the most effective way of preventing these losses. The definition on a Travelers Insurance policy for Employee Theft reads

 

“The Company will pay the Insured for the Insured’s direct loss of, or direct loss from damage to
Money, Securities and Other Property directly caused by Theft or Forgery committed by an
Employee, whether identified or not, acting alone or in collusion with other persons”

 

In addition to the employer being protected from covered losses due to theft and forgery, the exact definition of “who” is covered is defined in the policy, but should include all current or former employees, partners, members, directors, volunteers, trustees, seasonal employees and temporary employees. If the mint had one of these bond policies they would be insured against the conservatively estimated $180,000.00 loss.

 
Some of the typical exclusions to these policies are accounting or math errors, vandalism, Governmental action, restatement of a profit and loss statement and theft by the employer itself. You cannot steal from yourself; however coverage extends to partners, directors, members, and trustees.

 
To learn more about fiduciary bond products or any other types of bonds visit our website at www.bfbond.com, our blog at www.bfbond.com/blog , call us at 800.921.1008, email jward@bfbond.com with your inquiries or download the application here.

 

 

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How can small contractors and their customers benefit from Performance Bonds and Surety Bonds?

Posted by BFBOND on November 17, 2016
Bid and Performance Bonds, Bond Issues, Bonds FYI, Mechanic Lien, Surety Bonds, Uncategorized / Comments Off on How can small contractors and their customers benefit from Performance Bonds and Surety Bonds?

keep-your-cool-during-a-home-renovationEver watch HGTV (Home & Garden Television) and witness the horror stories left behind by shady contractors? Things like homeowners without kitchens or baths for months. Police recently arrested 45-year-old Cary Grimm on charges of grand theft for doing just that. Customers say the contractor disappeared without completing the work that was he was contracted for.

One couple said their home remodeling project turned into a nightmare after a few weeks’ delay turned into a half a year battle. The complaints which total nearly $90,000 based on over a dozen complaints by customers that came in after Grimm exhibited at a local home show. How could a surety bond aka performance Bond have helped? These bonds ensure a contractor will perform work required in a contract or winning bid.

Bonds provide small contractors and customers with numerous benefits. The surety bond is a form of protection against contractor default due to faulty workmanship, late delivery or not using specified materials. The surety company helps the contractor avoid costly delays and contract disputes if the sub-contract defaults with their portion of the job by non-performance.  Then the surety company will intervene to fulfill the contractor’s scope of work. When a project is bonded, there’s also an added layer of payment protection for workers and suppliers of the contractor.

Surety bonds help level the playing field, and allow a small contractor to compete in the free market, leading to lucrative contracting opportunities. Consumers and businesses feel more secure when hiring a bonded contractor.  A contractor’s bond and insurance are important forms of protection for anyone who is taking on a construction project.

Furthermore; to avoid a Mechanics Lien, a Payment bond is suggested.  Using this Surety Bond as a tool, gives owners assurance that all suppliers and sub-contractors are paid. Also suggested is an Ancillary bond to guarantee that non-material or performance requirements of a contract will be met. An example would be compliance with special terms, laws or regulations.

Call us to discuss your Performance, Bid, Ancillary and Payment bond requirements.

visit www.bfbond.com call 800-921-1008 or email Jward@bfbond.com

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In a former Swing State $5.5M embezzlement case, does your crime bond cover this?

Posted by BFBOND on November 08, 2016
Crime Coverage, Fidelity Bonds, Surety Bonds, Uncategorized / Comments Off on In a former Swing State $5.5M embezzlement case, does your crime bond cover this?

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An Indianapolis woman will learn her fate after admitting to six counts of wire fraud and money laundering in a $5.5 million embezzlement scheme.

No longer a swing state (The state typically votes Republican with an exception in 2008) Hoosiers will head to the polls as Kristi Espiritu will be headed to sentencing in U.S. District Court at 10 a.m. on Nov. 8. She worked at Network Storage Inc., a data storage company based in Indianapolis, from 2008 to 2014 as a bookkeeper.

Court records show that with access to the company’s bank accounts she used their money to pay for shopping trips to purchase luxury items such as diamonds, handbags, electronics, furnishings and travel. A common occurrence in employee theft losses. According to a plea agreement reached back in May she admitted to lying to company executives and falsifying books and payroll systems. Even the best managers,  can be over trusting and never spot check or have a system to verify the monies in their bank account to avoid crimes like this.

As a part of a plea deal she agreed to pay $5.5 million in restitution, if she can’t pay that amount before sentencing, federal officials will use asset forfeiture to recover the funds. If the company purchased a dishonesty bond to cover this crime, they would become whole and not be concerned if the employee had the monies to repay the theft.

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Espiritu could face up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine on four wire fraud charges, and 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine on two money laundering charges. White collar criminals steal through position and influence and quite often get away with their crimes for many years before getting caught.

It is unsure whether Network Storage Inc. had a fidelity bond (aka Crime Bond, Dishonesty Bond) which is a form of insurance protection that covers losses incurred as a result of fraudulent acts by specified individuals, usually insuring a business for losses caused by dishonest acts of its employees. Learn how fidelity bonds and surety bonds from BF Bond provide your growing business with the protection you require. Visit us at BFBond.com to fill out an application or call us at 800.921.1008

 

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The case of Prince, and when is an executor bond required?

Posted by BFBOND on November 04, 2016
Administrator, Administratrix, Court Bond, Executor, Executrix, Fidelity Bonds, Guardianship Bond, Personal Representative/ Administrator/ Executor Bond, Probate Bonds, Probate/Fiduciary Bonds, Surety Bonds, Uncategorized / Comments Off on The case of Prince, and when is an executor bond required?

princePrince Rogers Nelson, the legendary American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and record producer died unexpectedly on April 21st 2016. He was married twice and has no known surviving children. Prince’s sister and only full sibling Tyka Nelson filed court documents in Carver County, to open a probate case, stating that no will had been found. Prince’s five half-siblings also have a claim to his estate. As of three weeks after his death, 700 people claimed to be half-siblings or descendants!

As for Prince, it’s hard understand, why he never created a will or a full estate plan, especially given his wealth and complicated asset structures. On April 26, 2016, Bremer Trust was given temporary control of his estate without bond; this is very unusual considering the importance of having a probate bond. probate bonds, keeps everyone honest. It is designed to protect the deceased’s assets from being misappropriated or stolen by the executor. Theft is not limited to just writing checks to erroneous people, but selling property at deep discounts to friends or shady business partners or making sweetheart business arrangements with possible payoffs or kickbacks. All monies in the estate are to be used to settle the estate, pay taxes and anything left over goes to the rightful heirs, if the executor has done wrong, the bonding company will make the estate whole and then prosecute the executor.

The court can fine or remove an administrator (or executor) for failure to perform the duties faithfully. The administrator (or executor) in most cases must post a bond (paid from the decedent’s estate) to cover potential losses that the estate might suffer through error or mishandling of property during the administration process. Why the court did not require the probate bond, is a question for further investigation.
We provide different types of Surety bonds, Probate Bonds, License bonds, Fidelity bonds, Guardian Bonds , Fiduciary Bonds, and are licensed with Treasury listed companies in all 50 states. Visit us to learn more or call 1-800-921-1008 to speak with a customer service professional.prince_memorial__first_ave_2016

Appeal Bonds: to post a bond or deposit with the courts?

Posted by BFBOND on October 28, 2016
Appeal Bond, Bond Issues, Bonds FYI, Court Bond, Surety Bonds / Comments Off on Appeal Bonds: to post a bond or deposit with the courts?

justice-423446_1280In a Civil Case when an appeal bond is required by the judge, the principle has the option of getting a surety bond or depositing cash in the amount of the bond with the court. Does it make sense to obtain a surety bond or does it make sense to deposit money with the court? And if you do deposit with the court, how long before you get your  money back?

Benefits of Posting a bond:

  1. The benefit of posting an appeal bond is that the bonding company has options to take collateral in form of cash or brokerage account or Letter of Credit, in some incidents if your credit is strong enough, no collateral is required,  these options gives you the ability to leverage your money.  Of course if your credit is poor, then the collateral options are limited
  2. If successful in winning the appeal, the funds are returned to you very quick.

Cons of depositing money with the court:

  1. The courts only accept cash.
  2. Takes months before the paperwork is processed.
  3.  Access to capital is lost

Real Scenario:

A client mentioned that he could not meet his financial obligations due to the fact that he had a $400,000 deposit held with the court and they are taking over 6o days to release his funds..

At BF Bond our customer service professionals can address our client’s diverse need which often requires finding creative solutions to these problems. Retrieving deposits from the courts can be a long and arduous process. When faced with a decision like this that may cost you time and money, contact us and we can help make a difficult process much easier.

Complete an application here

Call Jose at 800-921-1008 if you have any questions or to discuss an individual case.

BF Bond, An insurance company worth recommending. since 1949

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Adjuster Bond Public and Independent

Posted by BFBOND on July 28, 2016
Adjuster Bond, Independent Adjuster, License and Permits Bonds, Nonresident Public Adjuster, Public Adjuster, Surety Bonds / Comments Off on Adjuster Bond Public and Independent

Adjuster Bond

Adjuster bonds is required by law if you operate as either a public adjuster or independent adjuster. The adjuster Bond penalty vary based on the required state.

List of States requiring a Public Adjuster Bond or Independent Adjuster Bond

California Insurance Adjuster Bond – $2,000

California Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Colorado Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Delaware Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $20,000

Florida Public Adjuster Bond – $50,000

Georgia Public Adjuster Bond – $5,000

Hawaii Public Adjusters Bond – $10,000

Idaho Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Illinois Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $20,000 (2 Years)

Indiana Nonresident Public Adjuster Bond – $10,000

Indiana Public Adjuster Bond – $10,000

Iowa Insurance Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Iowa Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Kentucky Independent Insurance Adjuster Bond – $1,000 (2 years)

Kentucky Insurance Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Kentucky Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Louisiana Public Adjuster Bond – $50,000

Minnesota Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $10,000

Mississippi Public Adjuster Bond – $50,000

Missouri Public Adjuster Bond – $10,000

Missouri Public Adjuster Solicitor Bond – $1,000

Montana Public Adjuster Bond – $5,000

Nevada Debt Adjuster Bond – $10,000

New Hampshire Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

New Jersey Public Adjuster License Bond – $10,000

New Mexico Insurance Adjuster Bond – $10,000

  New York Independent Adjuster Surety Bond – $1,000

Statistics recorded with Counterize - Version 3.1.4

  New York Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $1,000 for 2 years   

North Carolina Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $20,000

Ohio Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $1,000

Ohio Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $1,000

Ohio Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $1,000

Oklahoma Public Adjuster Bond – $25,000

Pennsylvania Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000 (1 year)

Pennsylvania Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000 (2 years)

Pennsylvania Public Adjuster Solicitor Bond

Public Adjuster Bond

Tennessee Public Adjuster Bond – $50,000

Tennessee Public Adjuster Bond (2 years) – $50,000

Texas Public Adjuster Surety Bond – $10,000

Virginia Public Adjuster Bond – $50,000

Washington DC Insurance Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Washington DC Public Adjuster Bond – $20,000

Washington Public Adjuster Bond – $5,000 only $100California Adjuster bond requires either $2,000 or $20,000

 

Public adjuster bond

The Public Adjuster Bond guarantees that you will comply with State laws and statutes and conduct business in accordance with all rules and regulations.

The Public Adjuster Bond is a license and permit surety bond that protects the policyholder for whom the adjuster rendered services from fraud, dishonesty, misstatement, misrepresentation, deceit and or any unlawful acts as they investigate the claim and issue their settlement recommendations.

 

You are required to obtain a surety bond to protect your clients. If you do not follow state regulations, a claim can be filed on your bond.

 

Why do you need a Public Adjuster Bond?

In the required States, any individual or business entity who aids an insured in negotiating the settlement of claims for loss or damage under an insurance policy or who advertises or solicits business as a public insurance adjuster is required to be licensed as a public insurance adjuster and obtain a surety bond to be in compliance with the state Statutes.

 

How long does the Public Adjuster Surety Bond last?

Each state has different year terms, 1 or 2 years, which means the bond will remain in effect until expiration date.

 

Call Jose: 800-921-1008 or email: JW@BFBOND.com

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Court and Fiduciary Bonds

In today ‘s complex society, more and more people are engaging in litigation, which creates an increased need for the various bonds required in many cases.
BFBOND.com assures prompt service, not only in providing these judicial bonds locally, but also for those which a lawyer or one of his clients may be re­quired to file in some other part of the country. We make our bonds and ser­vices available in all parts of the nation either directly working with the clients or through thousands of independent in­surance agents and brokers. And, to assure these representatives and their clients effective action when coverages are needed or losses sustained, Bernard Fleischer & Sons, Inc  maintains  an expertly-staffed sales, underwriting and claim office.
Since 1949, Bernard Fleischer & Sons, BFBOND.com  has been one of America’s pioneer bonding companies. We work with company ‘s ap­proved as surety on bonds required by the Federal government. Bernard Fleischer & Sons, BFBOND.com  consistently occupies a front-rank position in the surety field.
Our commitment to sound under­ writing principles enables us to pro­vide a stable source of expert bonding service. At Bernard Fleischer & Sons, Inc, we believe that the proper handling of many forms of surety bonds requires technical knowledge that can be acquired only by a concentrated study of the subject combined with years of practical experience in the application of such knowledge.
Attorneys have come to depend on Bernard Fleischer & Sons, Inc experience and unparalleled service in meeting the special bonding requirements of the legal profession, such as:
• Administrator’s/Executor’ sf Personal Representative’s Bonds
• Guardian/ Conservators/ Committee Bonds
• Testamentary Trustees Bonds
• Receivers Bonds
• Trustee in Liquidation Bonds
• Trustee in Reorganization Bonds
• Attachment/Garnishment Bonds
• Replevin Bonds
• Injunction Bonds
• Indemnity to Sheriff
• Counter-Replevin Bonds
• Appeal, Supersedeas, Stay of Execu­tion Bonds
• Release Attachment/Discharge Garnishment Bonds
• Dissolve Injunction Bonds
Contact us:

Visit: www.bfbond.com

William Fleischer, CIC

Jose Ward 800-921-1008 JW@bfbopnd.com

 

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Wage Bond for Nail Salons

Posted by BFBOND on December 03, 2015
Nail Salon Bond, Surety Bonds, Wage Bond / Comments Off on Wage Bond for Nail Salons

Application Click Here

New requirement by NYS all nail salons with the equivalent of two or more employees must have this bond by October 6th unless pending litigation results otherwise. Requirements:

2-5 EE                   $25,000 bond     Credit check, proof of insurance, properly signed application*  Good credit $500.00(Merchants App) not so good credit $1,250.00 (use plat river app)

6-10 EE                $40,000 bond     Same as above* Good $800.00 Bad $2,000

11-25 EE              $75,000 bond     Same as above & separate business and personal financials of owners*

26+ EE                  $125,000 bond   Same as above & separate business and personal financials of owners*

We can quote without signatures and proof of insurance

** if owners own more than one salon and the aggregate bond amount needed is $50,001 or more then separate business and personal financials of owners are required.

Call Jose today 800-921-1008 for quick and EZ bond issuance

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Definition/ Glossary of All Surety & Fidelity Bonds

 

   

GLOSSARY OF SURETY BOND TERMS

SURETY BOND: An agreement providing for monetary compensation should there be a failure to perform specified acts within a stated period.ACCOUNTING METHODS: For construction or building contractors, the two methods of accounting, both realistic and preferred by surety companies, are (a) the Completed Contract method, and (b) the Percentage-of-Completion method.

ADMINISTRATOR: A fiduciary appointed by a probate court to manage or distribute the assets of an estate of a person who died without leaving a will.

ADMINISTRATOR CUM TESTAMENTO ANNEXO OR WITH WILL ANNEXED: One appointed by a probate court to administer the estate where the deceased left a will but failed to name an executor or the one named as executor fails to qualify.

ADMINISTRATOR, CUM TESTAMENTO ANNEXO, DE BONIS NON: One appointed by a probate court to succeed an executor who has died, resigned, or been discharged before the administration is complete.

ADMINISTRATOR DE BONIS NON: One appointed by a probate court to succeed an administrator who has died, resigned or been discharged before the administration is complete.

ADMINISTRATOR PENDENTELITE: One appointed to preserve the assets of a decedent’s estate where the will is contested or other circumstances occur which delay qualification of an executor if there is a will, or the appointment of an administrator if there is no will.

ADVANCE PAYMENT BOND: Guarantees repayment or liquidation by the principal of moneys advanced in connection with a construction or supply bond or other type of contract.

AGGREGATE LIABILITY CLAUSE: A clause in a third party license bond which limits the surety’s liability to the bond penalty regardless of the number of claims made against the bond.

ALCOHOL BOND: A general term describing a bond given in compliance with federal or state laws or regulations governing the sale, manufacture or warehousing of alcohol for beverage or non-beverage purposes. Where the alcohol is intended for beverage purposes, the bond is frequently referred to as a liquor bond or intoxicating liquor bond.

ANNUAL BOND: One written to cover contractors or bids awarded or submitted during an annual period or for a period terminating within a fiscal year.

APPEAL BOND: One filed in court by a party against whom a judgment has been rendered, in order to stay execution of the judgment pending appeal to a higher court, in hope of reversing the judgment. The bond guarantees that the judgment will be paid if the appeal fails.

APPLICATION: A questionnaire which must be completed, when required, by an applicant for a bond. It gives the company information about the applicant and contains his/her agreement to indemnify the surety in the event of loss, as well as his/her promise to pay the premium.

ASSETS: The items on a balance sheet showing the book value of property owned. For a surety this could include all funds, property, securities, etc., or the property of an estate, whether real or personal.

ATTACHMENT BOND – PLAINTIFF’S: Attachment is taking a defendant’s property into custody by a summary process from the court in advance of the trial on the merits of the case. It is taken as security for the payment of any judgment that may be recovered by the plaintiff in the action. Attachment is allowed only where the plaintiff alleges a statutory ground for it (e.g. defendant is a nonresident or is about to leave the jurisdiction or remove or conceal his/her property). The bond, which the plaintiff is required to furnish, provides for indemnity to the defendant against loss or damage in case it is finally decided that a statutory ground did not exist or the plaintiff fails to recover a judgment against the defendant.

ATTACHMENT – DEFENDANT’S BOND TO DISCHARGE OR RELEASE: When an attachment has been issued, a defendant may discharge the attachment by giving the bond conditioned for the payment of any judgment that may be rendered against him/her in the action, with interest and costs.

BID BOND: Given by a bidder for a supply or construction contract to guarantee that the bidder, if awarded the contract within the time stipulated, will enter into the contract and furnish the prescribed performance bond. Default will ordinarily result in liability for the difference between the amount of the principal’s bid and the bid of the next low bidder who can qualify for the contract. In any event, however, the liability of the surety is limited to the bid bond penalty.

BLANKET FIDELITY BOND: A bond which covers loss of money, merchandise, or other property owned by the insured or in which he/she has a pecuniary interest, when such loss is due to dishonesty of his/her employees. All employees are covered under the bond unless specifically excluded.

BLANKET POSITION BOND: A blanket fidelity bond which covers all of the insured’s employees for a uniform amount on each so that if loss is caused by dishonest or fraudulent acts of two or more employees in collusion, recovery up to the amount of the bond may be made on each identifiable participating employee.

BLUE SKY BONDS: Many states control the sale of securities under regulations known as Blue Sky Laws. These laws are designed to prohibit the sale of worthless securities. The bonds required of security dealers indemnify purchasers against loss caused by false representations. The term Blue Sky Law originated when a court complained that certain stock was backed only by the blue sky.

BOND: Generally speaking, it is an agreement whereby one party, called the surety, obligates itself to a second party, called the obligee, to answer for the default of a third party, called the principal.

CANCELLATION CLAUSE: A clause in a bond which permits the surety to terminate its future liability by serving written notice upon the obligee.

CLAIMANT’S BOND: In cases where, pending final decision on the merits, property is released to one not a party to the litigation, who claims to be the owner thereof. The claimant may be required to give bond conditioned for the return or redelivery of the property if ordered to do so by the court.

CO-FIDUCIARY: One who serves as a fiduciary jointly with another, such as a co-administrator, co-executor, co-guardian, etc.

COLLATERAL: Anything of value pledged with the surety to secure it against loss by reason of default of the principal.

COLLUSIVE LOSS: A loss caused by two or more dishonest employees acting in consort.

COMMERCIAL BLANKET BOND: A blanket fidelity bond issued in a stated amount on all regular employees of commercial establishments covering against loss from employees’ dishonest acts.

COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE: The official charged with enforcement of the laws pertaining to insurance in his/her state. In some jurisdictions this official is called the superintendent or director of insurance.

COMMITTEE: One appointed by a court to manage the estate of a person who has been declared incompetent. Also known as conservator or a curator.

COMPLETION BOND: One covering performance of a construction project that names as an obligee a lender or similar party in a position to invoke the performance features of the bond for its benefit without an obligation to provide funds or to complete.

CONDITION: The technical name of one of the four parts of a bond. The condition is not a qualification of coverage as with an insurance policy, but is the essence of the guarantee.

CONSERVATOR: A person, official, or institution designated to take over and protect the interests of an incompetent.

CONTINUITY CLAUSE: The clause in a bond, or rider attached to a bond, under which that bond, subject to its terms, assumes liability for any loss due to acts which occurred while a prior bond was in force, but which were not discovered until after the expiration of the discovery period of the prior bond.

CONTRACT BOND: A guarantee of the faithful performance of a construction contract and usually the payment of all labor and material bills related to it. In those situations where two bonds are required – one to cover performance and the other to cover payment of labor and materials – the former is known as a performance bond, and the latter as a payment bond.

CONTRACT PRICE: The whole sum of money which passes from the owner to contractor when final settlement is made between the two under the contract, the basis for the premium charge on most types of construction and supply contract bonds.

CONVERSION: The wrongful taking of property entrusted to one’s care.

CORPORATE SURETY: A corporation licensed under various insurance laws, which under its charter, has legal power to act as surety for others.

COST BOND: One required of a litigant conditioned for the payment of the costs of the litigation, such as fees of the court clerk, sheriff, etc.

CO-SURETY: One or two or more surety companies directly participating in a bond. Their obligation to the owner is joint and several, but often a limit of liability for each surety is stated as between themselves.

COUNTERSIGNATURE: A signature of a licensed domiciled agent or representative required by the laws of some states to validate the bond.

COURT BONDS: A general term embracing all bonds and undertakings required of participants in a lawsuit permitting them to pursue certain remedies in the courts.

CUMULATIVE LIABILITY: The aggregate amount of two or more bonds in behalf of the same principal (or in the case of fidelity or blanket bonds, in favor of the same obligee) filed in succession, where the succeeding bond(s) does not extinguish the liability under the prior bond(s) or the liability of the surety is the penalty of the bond times the number of years in force.

CUSTOMS BONDS: These bonds guarantee the payment of import duties and taxes, and compliance with regulations governing the entry of merchandise from foreign countries into the United States.

DEDUCTIBLE: An amount which is to be “deducted” from any loss and which the insured agrees to bear personally.

DEPOSITORY BOND: This guarantees repayment of moneys deposited with a bank in the event of the failure or insolvency of the bank. While this is now a negligible line of surety business, it was once a large one. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) now guarantees the payment of bank deposits.

DEPOSITORY LIABILITY: A public official is liable for public funds which he/she deposits in a bank and cannot pay over because of insolvency or failure of the bank. In many states, statutes provide for the designation of depositories for public funds and for the furnishing of collateral security by such depositories. Such laws, if interpreted strictly, usually exempt the public official and his/her surety from liability for loss through failure of any of the designated and qualified depositories.

DEPOSIT PREMIUM: The advance premium required by a surety company on those forms of bonds which are subject to premium adjustment.

DISCOVERY BOND: A form of fidelity bond which covers against dishonest or fraudulent acts of employees, provided such loss is discovered any time after the bond becomes effective and before it is terminated, irrespective of when the dishonest or fraudulent acts were committed.

DISCOVERY PERIOD: Under certain bonds and policies, provision is made to give the insured a period of time after the cancellation of a contract in which to discover whether a loss was sustained that would have been recoverable had the contract remained in force. This period usually varies from six months to three years. The period may be determined by statute; in certain bonds, it is of indefinite duration because of statutory requirement.

DISHONESTY INSURANCE: A generic term describing fidelity bond coverage guaranteeing against loss caused by dishonest officers or employees of a commercial firm or by dishonest public officials or employees.

EARNED PREMIUM: The premium amount which would compensate the surety for the protection furnished for the expired portion of the term of the bond.

EFFECTIVE DATE: The date from which bond coverage is provided.

ENDORSEMENT: A form attached to the bond to add to, alter, or vary its provisions. Sometimes called a rider.

EXCESS BOND: Additional coverage over a primary bond protecting against certain perils (usually dishonesty) applying only to loss above a specified amount.

EXCLUSION: A provision in a bond referring to perils or property not covered.

EXECUTOR: One named in a will to distribute and settle the estate of the testator.

EXPENSE RATIO: The percentage of the premium used to pay all costs of acquiring, writing, and servicing the bond.

EXPERIENCE: The loss record of either an individual or a class of coverage.

EXPERIENCE RATING: A plan available for fidelity bonds whereby surcharges or discounts are applied to premiums developed by those risks based on the actual past experience of such risks.

EXPIRATION: The date upon which a bond will cease to provide coverage unless previously cancelled.

FAITHFUL PERFORMANCE BOND: A type of bond where the coverage goes beyond protection against loss due to dishonesty or fraudulent acts of the principal; it provides protection to the named insured against loss by reason of the failure of the persons covered hereunder to faithfully perform their duties as prescribed by law or by the constitution and bylaws of the insured or their equivalent.

FIDELITY BOND: A bond which will indemnify an insured for loss caused by a dishonest act or fraudulent act of an employee covered under the bond. Also known as dishonesty insurance.

FIDUCIARY: A person who occupies a position of trust, particularly one who manages the affairs or funds of another.

FIDUCIARY BOND: Required of administrators, executors, guardians, committees, etc., guaranteeing faithful performance of duty in accordance with the laws applicable to the trust. Frequently called a probate bond because the bond is customarily filed in a probate court.

FINANCIAL GUARANTEE BOND: A bond that guarantees payment of a sum of money whether or not the exact amount is known or stated. Common types are: court bonds (appeal, etc.), lease bonds which guarantee payment of rent, etc.

FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY LAW: A statute requiring motorists to furnish, either before or after an accident, evidence of ability to pay damages. Such evidence may be furnished by a surety bond.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT: A balance sheet which the surety requires of an applicant for a bond (particularly a contractor), setting forth his/her financial position as of a given time or period.

FIXED PENALTY BOND: A bond for which the amount is expressed in terms of a stated and definite sum of money.

FORFEITURE BOND: A bond where the full penalty is payable upon breach of the condition regardless of the amount of loss or damage.

GARNISHMENT – BOND TO DISCHARGE OR RELEASE: When money or property belonging to a defendant has been attached while in the hands of a third party, the proceeding is called a garnishment and the third party is called the garnishee. The bond is similar to a release of attachment bond.

GROSS LOSS: The amount of loss before giving effect to reinsurance. Usually reported inclusive of claim expenses. It may also be considered as the loss without allowance for collection of salvage.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM: One appointed to preserve the assets of the estate of a minor during a litigation which delays the appointment of a general guardian.

GUARDIAN OR GENERAL GUARDIAN: A fiduciary appointed by the court to administer the estate of a minor.

HAZARD: A term applied to certain conditions which may create or increase the probability of a loss, because of a given peril.

HOLD-OVER PUBLIC OFFICIALS: Those who are elected or appointed to succeed themselves in office or who continue beyond the limits of their terms until their successors are appointed or elected.

IMMIGRANTS BOND: A class of federal bonds covering aliens who enter the United States legally.

INCOME TAX BONDS: These are given to guarantee payment of federal income taxes due or claimed to be due. They are direct financial guarantees and collateral usually is required.

INDEMNIFY: To compensate for actual direct loss sustained under a bond. There can be no recovery on a bond until the obligee has actually suffered a loss.

INDEMNITOR: One who enters into an agreement with a surety company to hold the surety harmless from any loss or expense it may sustain or incur on a bond issued on behalf of another.

INDEMNITY BOND: A general term describing any bond which protects the obligee against direct loss which may arise as a result of failure on the part of a principal to perform.

INDEMNITY TO SHERIFF OR MARSHAL: A sheriff or marshal, in the execution of the process of the courts, may incur liability for damage to a third party through an act or acts which turn out to be wrongful. Either official when requested to take some particular action, may require a bond of the party making the request. The bond covers the liability of the sheriff or marshal in that connection.

INDIVIDUAL FIDELITY BOND: A bond covering a single employee for a specified amount to protect the employer in the event of the employee’s dishonesty.

INJUNCTION – PLAINTIFF’S BOND TO SECURE: An injunction is a judicial process whereby the defendant is required to do or refrain from performing a particular act. An order granting an injunction may be on the condition that the plaintiff furnish a bond to indemnify the defendant against loss in case it is decided that the injunction should not have been granted.

INJUNCTION – DEFENDANT’S BOND TO DISSOLVE: When an injunction has been issued, the court may order the injunction dissolved upon the giving of a bond. The bond guarantees payment the plaintiff may sustain as a result of the performance of the act or acts originally enjoined. It is then the privilege of the defendant to proceed as if the injunction had never been issued.

INSURING CLAUSE: That part of a bond or policy which recites the agreement of the insurer to protect the insured against some form of loss or damage. Also known as an insuring agreement.

INTESTATE: One who dies without a legal will.

INTERNAL REVENUE BONDS: A class of federal bonds which guarantee compliance of producers of distilled spirits, tobacco, etc., with applicable laws and regulations, as well as the payment of taxes.

JOINT CONTROL: An arrangement by written agreement between a fiduciary and a surety, acknowledged by the bank in which funds are deposited or securities lodged so that the funds or securities are controlled by both parties; usually all checks are required to be signed by the fiduciary and countersigned by an authorized representative of the surety and access to the securities can be had only in the presence of an authorized representative of the surety.

JOINT VENTURE: A joining of the financial resources and skills of several contractors to undertake contracts of construction too large for their individual and separate abilities.

JUDICIAL BOND: A general term applied to all bonds filed in court.

LABOR AND MATERIAL BOND: A bond given by a contractor to guarantee payment for the labor and material used in the work which he/she is obligated to perform under the contract. This liability may be contained in the performance bond, in which case a separate labor and material bond (payment bond) is not given.

LIABILITY: This is a broad term denoting any legally enforceable obligation.

LIBEL – BOND TO DISCHARGE OR RELEASE: When a warrant for the seizure of a ship has been issued, the marshal is required to stay execution of the process, or discharge the ship if process has been levied, on receiving from the owner of the ship a bond or stipulation conditioned to comply with the decree of court in the action.

LICENSE BOND: Used interchangeably with the term “permit bond” to describe bonds required by state law, municipal ordinance or regulation, to be filed prior to the granting of a license to engage in a particular business or a permit to exercise a particular privilege. Such bonds provide payment to the obligee for loss or damage resulting from violations by the licensee of the duties and obligations imposed upon him/her.

LIEN: A charge upon real or personal property for the satisfaction of a debt.

LIMIT OF LIABILITY: The maximum amount which a surety company will pay in case of loss. Sometimes called the bond penalty.

LOSS RATIO: The percentage of losses to premiums.

LOST INSTRUMENT BOND: A bond given by the owner of a valuable security (stock, bond, promissory note, certified check, etc.) which is alleged to have been lost or destroyed. It protects the issuer of the security against loss which may result from the reinsurance of a duplicate or, in some instances, payment of cash value thereof.

MAINTENANCE BOND: The normal coverage provided by a maintenance bond is a guarantee against defective workmanship or materials. However, maintenance bonds sometimes incorporate an obligation guaranteeing “efficient or successful operation” or other obligations of like intent and purpose.

MECHANICS LIEN – BOND TO DISCHARGE: A lien against real estate may be filed for an amount claimed to be due for labor or materials furnished for the construction of a building or other improvement upon the property. Pending final determination of the owner’s liability, the owner may discharge the lien by giving bond conditioned for the payment of any amount that may be found due to claimant with interest and costs.

MINIMUM PREMIUM: The least amount a surety company may charge for a particular bond for a designated period.

MISCELLANEOUS INDEMNITY BONDS: Bonds which do not fit any of the well recognized divisions or subdivisions.

MORAL HAZARD: The possibility of loss caused or accentuated by dishonesty or carelessness of the insured or others.

NAME SCHEDULE BOND: A fidelity bond which covers the employees listed in a schedule, each for a specified amount.

OBLIGEE: The party in whose favor a bond runs; the party protected by the bond against loss. An obligee may be a person, firm, corporation, government, or an agency of a government.

OBLIGOR: Sometimes called the principal, or one bound by the obligation. Under a surety bond, both principal and surety are in a sense, obligors, since the surety must answer if the principal defaults.

OPEN DEFAULT BOND: Where a judgment has been entered by default, the defendant may, under certain circumstances, have the case reopened and tried on its merits, upon giving a bond conditioned for the payment of any judgment that may be rendered in the action.

OPEN PENALTY BOND: A surety bond written without a limit on the liability of the principal or surety. Under the regulations of the federal government and the laws of many of the states, surety companies are not permitted to obligate themselves on any one bond for an amount greater than a specified percentage of their capital and surplus (qualifying power).

OUTSIDE EMPLOYEE: An employee, such as a salesmen, messenger, etc. whose duties keep him/her away from his/her headquarters.

PENAL SUM: The maximum amount for which a surety company may normally be held liable under the bond. Also called the bond penalty. See also limit of liability.

PERFORMANCE BOND: A bond which guarantees faithful performance of the terms of a written contractor for furnishing supplies or for construction of all kinds. Performance bonds frequently incorporate payment bond (labor and materials) and maintenance bond liability.

PERSONAL SURETY: An individual who acts as surety for another, who may or may not charge a fee for his/her guarantee, and usually is not regulated by any government agency, such as is the corporate surety.

PETITIONING CREDITORS’ BOND: When a petition is filed to have a person adjudged a bankrupt, an application is made to have a receiver or a marshal take charge of the property of the alleged bankrupt prior to the adjudication, the petitioners are required to give bond to indemnify the alleged bankrupt for such costs, counsel fees, expenses, and damages as may be occasioned by such seizure, in case the petition be dismissed or withdrawn by the petitioners.

POSITION SCHEDULE BOND: A fidelity bond which covers employees who may, while the bond is in force, occupy and perform the duties of the positions scheduled in the bond, each position being covered for a specific amount.

POWER OF ATTORNEY: The authority given one person or corporation to act for and obligate another, to the extent set forth in the instrument creating the power.

PREMIUM: The fee to be paid for the bond. The cost of the bond.

PRINCIPAL: The one who is primarily bound on a bond furnished by a surety company.

PROBATE BOND: One that guarantees an honest accounting and faithful performance of duties by administrators, trustees, guardians, executors, and other fiduciaries. So called because such bonds are customarily filed in a probate court. Also known as fiduciary bond.

PRO RATE CANCELLATION: Cancellation of a bond when the portion of the premium returned is the full proportionate part due for the unexpired period. Distinguished from short rate cancellation.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL BOND: A bond that guarantees faithful performance of duty of a public official in a position of trust; also provides for an honest accounting of all public funds handled by him/her. Such bond is given to comply with a statute and, therefore, carries whatever liability the statute imposes.

QUALIFYING POWER: The largest net amount of risk which may be carried by a surety company on a bond.

RATE: The cost of a unit of bond coverage. Such unit is usually in the denomination of $1,000.

RATE MANUAL: A book published by the Surety Association of America or by individual surety companies giving rates and classifications for bonds.

RECITAL: That portion of a surety bond usually commencing with the word “Whereas” which describes the transaction for which the bond is given. In the case of a guarantee of a contract it generally incorporates the contract by reference.

RECOVERY: Reimbursement received by a surety from a reinsurer, or by a subrogation, or from salvage following a loss.

REFUNDING BOND – RATE LITIGATION: This term is applicable to any bond conditioned for future return, if ordered, of money which the principal was allowed to charge and retain pending final determination or decision in a contested matter.

REMOVAL BOND: Where a case originally brought in a state court is removed to the federal court, the defendant is required to give bond for the payment of costs in federal court if the case is found to have been improperly removed. Similar bonds may be required on removal of a case from one state court to another.

REPLEVIN – PLAINTIFF’S BOND TO SECURE: Replevin is an action to recover possession of specific articles of personal property. The replevin bond, which the plaintiff is required to furnish, is conditioned for the return of the property, if return is ordered, and for the payment of all costs and damages adjudged to the defendant.

REPLEVIN – DEFENDANT’S BOND TO RECOVER PROPERTY REPLEVIED: Where personal property has been replevied, the defendant may, by the furnishing of a bond, regain possession of the property, pending final decision on the merits. The bond is conditioned for redelivery of property to the plaintiff, if ordered to do so, or otherwise to comply with a court order or judgment.

RETROACTIVE RESTORATION: A provision in a bond whereby, after payment of a loss, the original amount of coverage is automatically restored to take care of undiscovered losses as well as future losses.

RIDER: A printed form of special provision added to a bond. Sometimes called an endorsement.

SALVAGE: That which is recovered from the principal or an indemnitor to offset in whole or in part the loss and expense incurred by a surety in satisfying obligations it has sustained under a bond.

SCHEDULE BOND: One that covers loss resulting from dishonest or fraudulent acts of employees who are listed either by name or by positions scheduled in the bond.

SEQUESTRATION BOND: Substantially the same as Attachment Bond – Plaintiff’s.

SHORT RATE – SHORT RATE CANCELLATION: The charge required for bonds taken for less than a year, and in some cases, the earned premium for bonds cancelled by the insured before the end of the term of the bond; i.e., the earned premium plus an expense charge.

SHORT TERM BONDS: Those covering fiduciaries whose duties are to collect the assets of the decedent, pay the debts, and distribute the remainder according to law. These bonds are usually less than two years duration.

STATUTORY BOND: A term generally used describing a bond given in compliance with a statute. Such a bond must carry whatever liability the statute imposes on the principal and the surety.

STAY OF EXECUTION: A bond to stay or suspend execution on a judgment. It guarantees the payment of the judgment upon termination of the stay.

SUBCONTRACT BOND: One required by a general contractor of a subcontractor, guaranteeing that the subcontractor will faithfully perform the subcontract in accordance with its terms and will pay for labor and material incurred in the prosecution of the subcontracted work.

SUBDIVISION BOND: Many municipalities provide by ordinance that a developer who undertakes to lay out a housing or industrial subdivision shall give bond with surety to guarantee that, within a specified time, improvements on the property, such as streets, sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and sewers will be constructed.

SUBROGATION: The legal or equitable process by which a surety company obtains from a third party recovery of an amount paid out by the surety to the obligee or a claimant under the bond.

SUPERSEDEAS BOND: This is a bond to supersede or take the place of a judgment, and coverage is substantially the same as under a defendant’s appeal bond.

SUPERSEDED SURETYSHIP: When a company writes a bond to take the place of another bond which is cancelled on the effective date of the new bond, a rider is generally attached (unless the bond itself contains a superseded suretyship provision) agreeing to pay losses that would have been recoverable under the first bond except for the expiration of the discovery period.

SUPPLY BOND: A bond which guarantees faithful performance of a contract to furnish supplies or materials. In the event of a default by the supplier, the surety must indemnify the purchaser of the supplies against the loss occasioned thereby.

SURETY BOND: An agreement providing for monetary compensation should there be a failure to perform specified acts within a stated period.

SURETYSHIP: Refers to obligations to pay the debts of, or answer for, the default of another. It assumes a legal relationship based upon the contract in which one person (the surety) undertakes to answer to another (the obligee) for the debt, default, or miscarriage of a third person (the principal) resulting from the third person’s failure to pay or perform as required by an underlying contract.

TERM: A period of time for which a bond is issued.

TESTATOR: One who makes a will.

THIRD PARTY BOND: A license bond which gives parties other than the named obligee a right of action in their own name to recover loss or damage resulting from a breach by the licensee of his/her obligations under the law, ordinance or regulations under which the bond is required.

TREASURY LIMITS: These are qualifying limits imposed upon surety companies by the United States Treasury Department.

TRUSTEE: One named in a will or deed of trust to manage property for the benefit of another.

UNDERWRITER: An officer or employee of a surety company who has the responsibility for accepting risks.

PLEASE NOTE: This document is provided for informational purposes ONLY and is not intended to serve as legal advice and is no substitute for consulting legal counsel.